?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Poster printing question - Welcome...

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile

Links
--TAGS
--Anime/Manga List: A list of anime/live actions/musicals I've seen and mangas I've read
--My Deviantart Gallery
--My Tegaki blog
--My Facebook profile (lots of photos)
--My Tumblr

September 12th, 2009


Previous Entry Share Next Entry
08:42 am - Poster printing question
 I have a question for people on my f-list that are more knowledgeable about artwork-printing than me.

If I want to draw a poster (say, something like 35cm x 35 or 14in x 20in) in Photoshop what resolution (dpi) and canvas size should I be working in?  

Usually if I'm drawing something that I want to print out on a regular sized paper (8.5in x 11in) I'll work in 300dpi on a canvas size of 8in x 10.5in so that when I print it everything's still clean and clear, not fuzzy and crappy after having to enlarge, but given how huge some posters can be I have a feeling artists don't necessarily have to work on a canvas the same size as the poster that they want to print out in the end.  Do printing places do some funky maneouvering to enlarge images to poster-size without losing resolution?

Thanks~

Tags: ,

(9 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:sapphosdaughter
Date:September 12th, 2009 09:04 am (UTC)
(Link)
For starters, working in Photoshop is not really the best tool for print documents. You'd be better off to work in Illustrator for various reasons -- one being that Illustrator is vector based and you can resize the .ai file to whatever size you want and the thing will stay nice and clear.

In my program right now, "New Media & Publication Design, when we are working on a print document in Illustrator and we're planning on printing on say 8.5" by 11" paper we do work in that size. Professional printers can print all the way to the edge of the page so that shouldn't be a concern. I would say if you want to make a 8.5" by 11" poster, work in that size even if you don't plan on taking up the entire sheet as this will help you plan your composition more accurately, but also permit you to go right to the edge if you so desire.

If you're going to stick to Photoshop, 300 dpi or more is really the best thing you can do to get the best quality if your image when you print.

I would recommend though calling various print shops and asking them what format they would want the files in, along with what level of dpi before starting. Then you know you're doing the best thing to ensure a quality print-out from that particular print shop.
[User Picture]
From:cavechan
Date:September 12th, 2009 09:33 am (UTC)
(Link)
Actually, the most appropriate program would be inDesign (or Quark). It was specifically made for layout.

All vector stuff is done in Illustrator. All pixel-image editing in Photoshop. Then import to inDesign and lay out the elements. Then print! :)
[User Picture]
From:sapphosdaughter
Date:September 12th, 2009 09:44 am (UTC)
(Link)
We haven't touched Indesign yet but we're already doing print design entirely in Illustrator which prints much better than my old art print outs back in the day that I was doing it from Photoshop.

I think we're touching Indesign second year by the looks of the courses listed per semester.
[User Picture]
From:cavechan
Date:September 12th, 2009 02:12 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I love inDesign. So easy to use and rarely gives me problems. Illustrator gives me the most problems. *grr*

If you're a graphic design major like I was, then you will be living in it.
[User Picture]
From:cavechan
Date:September 12th, 2009 09:35 am (UTC)
(Link)
300dpi is fine for a 14x20" poster. Really, you only need to worry about bringing it down when you have HUGE banners/billboards. Billboards (the printed kind anyway) use something like 30dpi. XD

I don't think printing places will do that for you, BUT you can always call and ask if they will. :D
[User Picture]
From:koneko_desu
Date:September 12th, 2009 10:06 am (UTC)
(Link)
Bringing down the dpi?? I thought the higher the dpi the clearer the image when printed?? Wouldn't bringing it down to something like 30dpi make it super-blurry once it's printed?
[User Picture]
From:cavechan
Date:September 12th, 2009 02:10 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Up close you can clearly make out the dots that make up the dpi on a billboard. But from your car, you won't be able to tell the difference. :D
From:(Anonymous)
Date:October 14th, 2009 05:07 am (UTC)

PrintPlace

(Link)
300 dpi is definitely high enough of a resolution for even large format posters, but you may want to contact your printing company just to make sure what their preferences or recommendations are. Some printing companies (http://www.printplace.com) even provide templates for every poster printing (http://www.printplace.com/printing/poster-printing.aspx) size, for most design programs. This may help you with some of your designing hang ups.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:October 25th, 2009 03:19 pm (UTC)

Poster Printing

(Link)
As long as your file is created at 300 dpi, any printer can blow up your poster to a larger size. When people create files in photoshop at 72dpi, then when it is blown up, it looks fuzzy. You created in 300 dpi so there will be no problem. For Poster Printing I suggest u contact www.theposterprinters.com. I have used them in the past and they were great

> Go to Top
LiveJournal.com